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Wednesday, August 5, 2020 | History

2 edition of Effects of slope roughness on wave run-up on composite slopes found in the catalog.

Effects of slope roughness on wave run-up on composite slopes

Jerry L. Machemehl

Effects of slope roughness on wave run-up on composite slopes

by Jerry L. Machemehl

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  • 39 Currently reading

Published by Texas A & M University, Sea Grant Program in [College Station] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Ocean waves.,
  • Waves.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementJerry L. Machemhl and John B. Herbich.
    SeriesSea Grant publication / Texas A & M University -- TAMU-SG-70-222., Coastal and Ocean Engineering Division report -- no. 129., TAMU-SG -- no. 70-222., COE report -- no. 129.
    ContributionsHerbich, John B., Texas A & M University. Office of the Sea Grant Program., Texas A & M University. Coastal and Ocean Engineering Division.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxi, 243 leaves :
    Number of Pages243
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16111097M

    Wave Run-Up On Roughened And Permeable Slopes by Rudolph P. Savage, Serial Information: Transactions of the American Society of Civil Engineers, , Vol. , Issue 1, Pg. Document Type: Journal Paper Abstract: Laboratory tests determining run-up on various beach slopes as result of wave action are described; curves relating run-up to wave steepness, slope roughness, and slope. D. A. Peiris and Wijetunge J. J., “Effect of relative water depth and foreshore slope on wave run-up on smooth slopes,” in Proc. Peradeniya University Research Sessions, Peradeniya, Sri Lanka,Vol. 8, , p.

      It increases with channel slope. Even at low slopes (S ∼) the predicted flow depth required to transport bed load in a river with typical flow resistance is about twice the depth required in a river with only the base level of resistance, and at slopes of ∼ the ratio is almost 5. In even steeper channels bed movement is restricted. Factors That Control Slope Stability Mass wasting happens because tectonic processes have created uplift. Erosion, driven by gravity, is the inevitable response to that uplift, and various types of erosion, including mass wasting, have created slopes in the uplifted regions.

    TAW, Technical Report Wave Run-up and Wave Overtopping at Dikes. TAW, Technical Advisory Committee on Flood Defences. Author: J. W. van der Meer. EAK, Ansätze für die Bemessung von Küstenschutzwerken. Chapter 4 in Die Küste, Archive for Research and Technology on the North Sea and Baltic Coast. Empfehlungen für Küstenschutzwerke. spacing is similar to the size of the tunnel or slope being analyzed, and where the failure processes are clearly anisotropic. The Hoek–Brown criterion is a strength criterion — not a constitutive relation. Scale effects are difficult to assess, particularly for large rock slopes.


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Effects of slope roughness on wave run-up on composite slopes by Jerry L. Machemehl Download PDF EPUB FB2

A comprehensive study of the wave run-up phenomena on single and composite slopes was conducted in order to determine the effects of slope roughness on regular and irregular wave run-up on composite sections, to determine the effects of slope roughness on the velocity distribution in the uprush zone, to investigate the energy loss in the uprush Cited by: 3.

AbstractImpulse wave trains are generated by subaerial landslides, rockfalls, or avalanches impacting a water body. Especially in engineered reservoirs, the run-up. Hannover, Germany, is conducted to study parameters of the long wave run-up on a plane beach. The main purpose of current series is to investigate the influence of the slope roughness on the wave run-up.

Run-up height, dissipation of wave energy, and the force acting on individual roughness elements are analysed. INTRODUCTION. This paper analyses wave reflection from composite slopes by means of an extensive database, which includes smooth and rock (permeable and impermeable core) slopes and slopes.

Roughness influence factor γ f = 1 − c 0 R c / (H m 0 ξ m − 1,0) with c 0 = for protruding blocks on the straight slopes and composite slope slopes with a berm; c 0 = for open blocks on the straight slope and c 0 = for open blocks on the slopes with a by: 3.

Therefore, guidance is given first on the use of wave run-up and wave overtopping formulae for simple slopes, excluding the effects of composite slopes, direction of wave attack, roughness, wave walls, etc.

Then, formulae are presented to include these. A series of laboratory experiments on the wave run-up on smooth slopes and sandbag slopes were conducted in a regular-wave flume, leading to the finding of empirical parameters for the formula. The shape of the expression to account for the reducing effect of a roughness as proposed by Chen et al.

() is as follows: (3) γ f = 1 − c f R c H m 0 ξ m − 1,0 where Chen et al. () derived c f = for protruding blocks on straight impermeable slopes and composite slopes with a berm, c f = for open blocks on a straight. If anything, the depth of flow appears to be greatest on the plane slope.

Finally the effect of roughness blocks on the evolution of a broken wave is shown in Figure 5. Here the wave interacts with the roughness blocks lower down the wall when compared with the low and high-aeration waves.

that predicts irregular wave runup over such a wide range of slopes is convenient, and it supports the simple concept used to derive the runup equation. Irregular Wave Runup Prediction for Rough, Impermeable Slopes: Slope roughness will reduce the 2-percent runup level predicted using the equations for smooth, impermeable slopes.

WAVE REFLECTION FROM COMPOSITE SLOPES Barbara Zanuttigh 1 and Jentsje W. van der Meer 2 This paper analyses wave reflection from composite slopes by means of an extensive database, which includes smooth and rock (permeable and impermeable core) slopes and slopes with all kind of artificial armour units.

On steep walls (vertical, battered or composite), ‘pulsating’ conditions occur when waves are relatively small in relation to the local water depth, and of lesser wave steepness. These waves are not critically influenced by the structure toe or approach slope.

Waves run up and down the wall giving rise to (fairly) smoothly varying loads. Create a new account. Are you an ASCE Member. We recommend that you register using the same email address you use to maintain your ASCE Member account.

ABSTRACT Storm flooding has caused extensive damage in coastal areas for centuries. Seawalls, breakwaters and dikes have been built in recent years to protect densely populated and highly industrialized coastal areas from destructive storms. In some. known to depend on the local water level (including surf beat or infragravity wave effects), the incident wave conditions (height, period, steepness, direction), and the nature of the beach or structure being run up (e.g., slope, reflectivity, height, permeability, roughness).

Wave overtopping—i.e., excess of water over the crest of a coastal protection infrastructure due to wave run-up—of a smooth slope can be reduced by introducing slope roughness.

A stepped revetment ideally constitutes a slope with uniform roughness and can reduce overtopping volumes of breaking waves up to 60% compared to a smooth slope. D FEMA Wave Runup Model Description (RUNUP ) The current version of the FEMA Wave Runup Model is RUNUP This model requires the following inputs: the stillwater flood level (without wave setup), the shore profile and roughness, and incident deepwater wave conditions.

The program computes, by iteration, a mean. This study utilized a shock-capturing Boussinesq model FUNWAVE-TVD to investigate the maximum momentum flux in the solitary wave run-up zone over back-reef slopes.

Validation results of the present model were compared to the previous version of FUNWAVE using the eddy viscosity breaking model to demonstrate the advantages of the shock-capturing method in predicting the breaking solitary wave.

The level given by Equation is for the 2% runup level. This runup level is defined as the runup level exceeded by 2% of the incoming waves. Thus, 2% of the waves will run up higher than this level. The roughness coefficient (r) accounts for the roughness of the surface of the revetment with r = 1 for smooth slopes.

The roughness of a slope and its permeability, which can be described by a characteristic diameter of the armour unit and the porosity of the layer, are not used in the description of the run-up.

This report is an attempt to get insight into the influence that the roughness and the permeability of a slope have on the run-up on this slope.

by Saville () and Saville () analyzing the wave run-up on composite slopes. Within revetments of smooth surfaces, riprap and vertical walls although a slope (n = ) with stepped revetment – here called ’Step - Faced Wall’ – was analyzed regarding wave run-up (25 tests) and wave overtopping (88 tests).

This paper presents a parametric study on various factors influencing the overall stability of soil-nailed slopes. Stability analysis was performed to study the effect of slope geometry, nail parameters and effect of rising water surface within the slope on the overall stability of soil-nailed slopes.The variable S is longitudinal channel bed slope.

The variable. n. is the empirically derived roughness or boundary resistance. coefficient called Manning’s roughness or.

n-value. Using the flow. continuity equation, in which streamflow is equal to flow area times. flow velocity, a second form of Mannings equation is possible.